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CBS Evening News With Russ Mitchell

News/Business. Russ Mitchell. The latest world and national news. New. (CC) (Stereo)

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00:30:00

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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Westwood 7, Cbs 4, New York 4, Us 4, Cbs News 3, America 3, Germany 3, Justin 2, Richard Roth 2, Michelle 2, Buster 2, Russ Mitchell 2, Jeff Greenfield 2, Tony Guida 2, New Orleans 2, Washington 2, Chile 2, Zantac 2, U.s. 2, China 2,
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  CBS    CBS Evening News With Russ Mitchell    News/Business. Russ Mitchell. The latest  
   world and national news. New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    September 5, 2010
    6:00 - 6:30pm EDT  

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go to pnc.com/businessloans to see how we can help your cash flow situation. pnc. for the achiever in us all. >> mitchell: tonight an important clue to the cause of the gulf oil spill comes to the surface. what the failed blowout protector might tell us. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight the battle for congress. can democrats do anything to prevent republicans from gaining control of the house and senate? congress is investigating colleges that are run for profit. we'll tell you why. and traffic buster. china's plan to bypass traffic jams that might work in america. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it took almost 30 hours but a key piece of evidence in the gulf oil spill is now
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out of the ocean and on its way to be examined. the blowout preventer, a massive piece of machinery that failed to stop the gusher could hold major clues to preventing future oil spills. tony guida has more on the device and the investigation. >> reporter: rising slowly from the floor of the gulf of mexico, a one million pound hunk of yellow metal once attached to an oil well in the gulf. the blowout preventer that did not live up to its name. it's recovery could be the rosseta stone to the worst environmental disaster in american history. >> we want to know why it did not function the way that it was supposed to. and second, we don't want this to happen again. >> reporter: this was america's first look at the complex device that could have saved 11 lives aboard the deepwater horizon rig and prevented some 200 million gallons of oil from fouling the gulf of mexico and hundreds of miles of shoreline. the blowout preventer was supposed to slice through
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the drill pipe in an emergency and seal the well. it failed. >> it's possible that the well head assembly had two pieces of drill pipe in it rather than a single piece and the blowout preventer wasn't able to sheer through both pipes. >> reporter: lifting the blowout preventer out of the sea was a painstakingly slow process. it took almost 30 hours. when it was complete, admiral thad allen released this statement "the damaged blowout prevent certificate now under the supervision of the deepwater horizon criminal investigation team, and fbi evidence recovery team" >> the oil industry in the gulf is treading water since the government's moratorium on deepwater drilling. a b.p. engineer said recovery of the blowout preventer might change that. >> knowing that we have the piece back on surface and the investigation moving forward, be able to better get the oil industry back up and moving again. >> reporter: it will take several days for the blowout
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preventer to reach land. it will be taken to a nasa facility near new orleans. results of the investigation will be of great interest to the many victims of the oil spill who have filed hundreds of lawsuits because of it. tony guida, cbs news, new york. >> mitchell: in politics, labor day marks the beginning of the dash to election day. and democrats are in full sprint trying to beat back a strong challenge from republicans to seize control of congress. bob orr now on the democrats plan to avoid catastrophe. >> reporter: in fairfax, virginia. >> can we do it? are. >> reporter: first term democrat incumbent jerry connolly is working this labor day weekend to hang on to his congressional seat. >> i'm talking to many of my colleaguesment they get the threat. they understand that there is understandable anxiety in the country given the state of the economy but they're prepared going into battle. >> reporter: but connolly's race is just one of dozens
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the democrats could lose. in a midterm election that appears to be increasingly tilting towards republicans. the latest gallop poll has no good news for democrats. republicans have a 10 point lead, 51% to 41% on the generic ballot. and democratic voters are in the dumps with twice as many republicans saying they're very enthusiastic about voting this fall. while party leaders are not con seating control of the house they are looking to cut their losses by redirecting campaign funds to the strongest democratic candidates. >> we will look at races that we can win. so we make a determination about whether or not those campaigns can be successful at the end of the day. >> reporter: president obama who returned to the white house today from a holiday weekend in camp david will hit the road this week to focus on the economy. and spell out what democrats are doing to help create more jobs. it's clear he has a lot of work to do. >> democrats, i think, are rightly very, very nervous, much more pessimistic today
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than they were a month ago. if you look at the number of races in play, it is 60-70, maybe 80 or 90 seats that potentially could turn over. >> reporter: but national democratic committee chairman tim cane say variety-- voters are just now starting to tune in. >> they start to pay attention in the labor day to election day window and as they look to make their choice, the choices will be clear and we think that clarity is going to help our candidates. >> reporter: now while republicans are content to watch the democrats squirm, the truth is their approval rates are just as bad. john mccain warned his party candidates they still have to give voters a reason to vote for them. >> mitchell: bob orr in washington. thanks. >> and joining us with some thoughts on all this is our senior political correspondent jeff greenfield, good evening. >> howdy, russ. >> mitchell: what can the democrat does. >> they are looking for a blowout prevent tore minimize the damage and they think they have three, one they have more money than republicans to spend in the house and senate though that could change. they think they could localize races to insurance late their candidates from the national mood of discontent and they think
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that some of the candidates the republicans have nominated the tea party types may be too far outside the mainstream. we're seeing some of that in places like nevada and colorado but that's a very thin reed to build support for your own candidates. >> mitchell: in real and symbol-- symbolic what is at stake. >> i think is real. the obama domestic agenda is finished if the republicans gain control of one house or even sharply reduce senate majority. remember the democrats barely prevailed in the senate with 60 votes. they are also looking with no glee, no happiness to the prospect of massive investigations if the republicans take the house or the senate, subpoenas, committee hearings on alleged wrongdoing. so the whole climate shifts in the last two years of obama's term if the republican does what the polls now say they may well do. >> mitchell: when you look in governor's races what do you see. >> we see the possibility that in every state but new york, november could result in republican governors in all of those big states. remember next year, all the house districts get redrawn because of redistricting and governors play a big role. big gains for republicans in
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the governor houses means big gains to republicans two years down the road in the house. it is a big matter. >> mitchell: jeff greenfield, thanks a lot. >> thank you. >> mitchell: overseas, mudslides from torrential rains killed at least 38 people in weekend in guatemala. and left dozens missing. 12 people died when a bus was crushed by mud yesterday. today many others were buried as they tried to help victims. >> it now day 32 since the collapse of that gold-- gold and copper mine in chile. 33 miners remain deep underground and as rescue work continues, those trapped and their families are getting a glimpse of hope. seth doa ne reports. >> dad, how are you, she shouts to the screen. separated by a half mile of rock and seemingly a world apart, miners can now connect with their families by videoconference. it was a very emotional experience to see him after such a long time, this wife of a miner says.
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to boost more alle for families just wait-- morale for families just waiting an waiting these former rugby players made a special visit. their real life drama inspired a book and then the movie "alive" which tells of their 72 day story of survival in the andes mountains before they were rescueed. their plane crashed while headed to a game in chile back in 1972. the miners are capable of living through something like this, this crash survivor said, with support and humility. and add to that, life-saving supplies. as part of regular deliveries through one of three small shafts, miners are now receiving new clothes. and even poles to build small cots. to give you a sense of how far underground they are trapped, compare their nearly 2300 foot depth with the statue of liberty. or the eiffel tower which is
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just over a thousand feet tall. even the empire state building appears dwarfed. so far workers boring the main rescue tunnel have drilled down about 130 feet. once that rescue shaft is completed, it's estimated it could take around three hours to pull each miner to safety. work on the second and planning for a third rescue tunnel is under way. and officials are driven to find any route to reach these miners faster. as the world watches and waits. seth doa ne, cbs news, new york. >> mitchell: a famous company in germany has come up with a new unique way to help its employees extend their work lives. richard roth has more on a program that could some day make its way to a workplace near you. >> reporter: just looking at its 18,000 workers here bmw worried the problem was inevitable. it's committed to producing more than 1200 luxury cars a
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day with a workforce that is getting older. >> you could force them to retire. you could fire them. you could find easier jobs for them. >> yeah, that might be the simple way to solve the problem. that's not the solution which we will look for, especially since we don't have enough younger people actually to replace. so it wouldn't even work if we wanted to. >> reporter: it is happening everywhere. over 65s will make up more than 16% of america's population by 2020. germany's aging even faster. more than a fifth of the country will be 65 within ten years. even the smartest engineers at bmw had to accept that an aging workforce was inevitable. but they wondered if a workforce that's less productive might be preventable. in what the harvard business review calls an experiment diffusing its demographic time bomb bmw management tinkered with the staffing on one assembly line so that
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the average age of workers here would be 47. then it asked them how to make things better. that's the new magnifying. >> it is very simple because older people can't read any more as good as young people do. >> reporter: workers said their feet hurt so the company made them special shoes. and put in wooden floor pads. some got a place to sit. everyone got a chance to stretch. in all, there were 70 small changes introduced including lost time bmw says the projects cost about $50,000. >> that's nothing. we basically thought it would be maybe ten times as much, we would need to invest. >> reporter: and it paid off. productivity went up 7%. and the lines defect rate dropped to zero. time off for sick leave fell below the factory average. >> all the response i have been receiving is wow, it's so simple but it seems to work. >> reporter: so the experiments expanding to
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other plants including in the u.s. bmw doesn't think all its manufacturing can be redesigned to capitalize on an aging workforce. but it is confident that workers here won't just be getting older, they really will be getting better. richard roth, cbs news, germany. >> mitchell: and coming up on tonight's "cbs evening news", the college she attended made a profit. but she says her degree is worthless and she has a debt of $86,000. and i need to run off to the bathroom. i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. so today i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder. [ female announcer ] if you're suffering, today is the day to talk to your doctor and ask about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents
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all day and all night. plus, toviaz comes with a simple plan with tips on food and drink choices. if you have certain stomach problems or glaucoma or cannot empty your bladder, you should not take toviaz. toviaz can cause blurred vision and drowsiness, so use caution when driving or doing unsafe tasks. the most common side effects are dry mouth and constipation. [ jackie ] i asked my doctor about toviaz. and today i'm looking forward to my daughter's wedding. [ female announcer ] why wait? ask about toviaz today. [ female announcer ] why wait? no oil has flowed into the gulf for weeks, but it's just the beginning of our work. i'm iris cross. bp has taken full responsibility for the clean up in the gulf and that includes keeping you informed. my job is to listen to the shrimpers and fishermen,
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hotel and restaurant workers and find ways to help. that means working with communities. we have 19 centers in 4 states. we've made over 120,000 claims payments, more than $375 million. we've committed $20 billion to an independent claims fund to cover lost income until people impacted can get back to work. we'll keep looking for oil, cleaning it up if we find it and restoring the gulf coast. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. bp is gonna be here until the oil is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal... until we make this right. [ both screaming ] i got into one of the most expensive schools in the country! [ male announcer ] when stress gives you heartburn with headache... alka-seltzer gives you relief fast. [ low male ] plop, plop. [ high male ] fizz, fizz.
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♪ that's not really my style, honey. weird, i can't find it. ♪ [ female announcer ] new tide original with acti-lift technology helps remove many dry stains as if they were fresh. hey! you found it. yeah, it must have been hiding in my closet. [ female announcer ] new tide original with acti-lift. style is an option. clean is not. get acti-lift in these tide detergents. >> mitchell: no segment of higher education is growing faster than for-profit colleges. enrollment has shot up from 365,000 a few years ago to five times that now. but complaints by dissatisfied institutes are also rising. congress holds hearings again this month after investigators went undercover. here's wyatt andrews. >> reporter: two years after graduation, michelle does
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not know how her college debt reached $86,000. she was told the cost would be less. and all for a criminal justice degree she says many police agencies don't recognize. her degree came from westwood college, a for-profit school with 17 campuses. >> it definitely is a false american dream. i can't-- i can't get a job. i'm in debt. and i'm living at home. >> then i got my cap and gown. >> reporter: justin, another westwood institute borrowed $84,000 and also says he was never told the true cost. he describes his degree in video game design as almost worthless. >> i feel like i went to wal-mart and bought myself a degree. >> reporter: wide spread complaints like this, overpriced degrees, misleading claims and an alarming level of institute debt led to some embarrassing revelations this year on the entire for-profit college industry including westwood. when the gao went undercover
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to investigate how 12 for-profit colleges recruited their institutes. >> some institutes are making-- a day. >> reporter: and found that every one, 12 out of 12 made deceptive claims and that four colleges encouraged fraud. here a westwood sales rep tells the gao agent not to report a quarter million dollar bank account in order to maximize his institute loans. >> just fyi, they don't need to know your cash. >> reporter: in june, the senate heard testimony on why these colleges recruit so aggressively. >> if you excuse the language, putting asses in classes. >> reporter: turns out the explosive growth of the industry including its biggest names like cap lane and the university of phoenix is being funded by institutes using taxpayer financed grants and loans. the industry now educates 10% of all college institutes. 1.8 million. but those institutes get 23% of federal loans and grants and are the most likely to
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default on those loans. >> the whole business model of the for-profit school industry depends on taxpayer money. >> reporter: the for-profit college system does play a critical role in society. it serves older institutes, workers between jobs, and adults upgrading their skills. but now to protect taxpayers against huge losses, the department of education wants some new rules, including one that would expel a for-profit school from the institute loan program until more of its graduates start to pay. the industry is fighting that rule, calling it a penalty for serving low-income institutes who can't attend state university. >> we are always going to have higher default rates than those who go too much more highly selective traditional institutions. >> reporter: westwood college declined our interview request but claims that most of its graduates have, quote, positions in their field of study. justin meanwhile works in a mailroom. michelle, in retail. >> they've put me in a situation where if i'm lucky,
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i will recovery around the age of 50 or 60. >> reporter: westwood tells cbs news michelle got the information she needed on the cost and value of her degree. but westwood and the other colleges caught on tape by the gao have promised to improve their recruiting. and give institutes more information on tuition and the odds of getting a job. wyatt andrews, cbs news, washington. it's calcium citrate, so it can be absorbed with or without food. also available in small, easy-to-swallow petites. citracal. 100% natural nuts and granola in bite sized clusters. it's a little bit of nature... a little bit better. and nature approves. granola nut clusters from nature valley.
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>> mitchell: in medical news this sunday scientists said today they identified a po teen critical in fighting deadly west nile virus in mice. they say it could lead to possible therapies for fighting the mosquito spread virus in humans. in the final weekend box office of the summer "the american" with george clooney was the winner taking 13 million dollars so far. but for the summer as a whole the picture was mixed. hollywood wrapped up a record $4.5 billion because of higher ticket prices. actually movie attendance was the lowest in 13 years. in tennis, serena williams is not playing in this year's u.s. open because of injury. but older sister venus is and she is the only american woman left in the tournament. today she beat israel-- in
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straight sets to reach the quarterfinals for the tenth time. she has won the open twice. and ahead on tonight's "cbs evening news", a dream solution for drivers stuck like this. that's not really my style, honey. weird, i can't find it. ♪ [ female announcer ] new tide original with acti-lift technology helps remove many dry stains as if they were fresh. hey! you found it. yeah, it must have been hiding in my closet. [ female announcer ] new tide original with acti-lift. style is an option. clean is not. get acti-lift in these tide detergents. i'm friend, secret-keeper and playmate. do you think i'd let osteoporosis slow me down? so i asked my doctor about reclast because i heard it's the only once-a-year iv osteoporosis treatment. he told me all about it and i said that's the one for nana.
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>> mitchell: for the second time this summer, all traffic came to a halt on a chinese highway. since last wednesday, the jam near the mongolian border has grown to 75 miles. but on the horizon reports there is a traffic buster to the rescue,. >> reporter: think traffic is bad where you live? try beijing which recently topped a survey measuring computer pain. and where traffic jams can stretch for miles and last for days. not surprising in a city with 4.5 million vehicles for 20 million people am but this bright idea called the straddle bus, part bus, part train, part moving tunnel could soon solve real traffic nightmares. using a mix of solar power and electricity, the bus runs on tracks that can be installed on existing roads allowing small vehicles to drive underneath. the price tag to build the
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space-age bus is $7.4 million. and it holds up to 1400 passengers. the bus can reduce 25 to 30% of traffic congestion because it doesn't occupy road space exchains the chinese inventor,. the idea is proving an international hit with urban planners from the u.s. to india. what if bay binge-- beijing straddle bus is gaining traction, here desperate time calls for desperate measures. a 75 mile backup of cargo trucks outside china's capital has frustrated drivers since mid-august. >> if we don't stay in line, we have no way to enter beijing explains this man. he will need patience. the traffic jam is expected to drag on until december when road construction is complete. in central beijing roads to the north stretching for miles all the way to the south are packed at all hours of the day. traffic is becoming a defining feature of this
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city creating a major headache for those who live here. >> reporter: beijing is investing in public transport. miles of new subway tunnels, bike lanes and express bus routes. but there's little political will to break the depend ent-- dependence on cars. >> half of the economy at least looking at the numbers of the first half of 2010 was built on auto sales and related consumption. >> reporter: 20 years ago beijing was the kingdom of bicycles. now has gone car crazy. still, some believe the futuristic straddle bus might give the chinese capitol a chance to regain some of the peace of its past. cbs news, beijing. >> mitchell: and that is the "cbs evening news." later on cbs, "60 minutes." thanks for joining us this sunday evening. i'm russ mitchell, cbs news, in new york. i'll see you again back here tomorrow night. good night. captioning sponsored by cbs
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captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org ,,